Petraeus Case Raises Concerns About Americans’ Privacy – NYTimes.com

The F.B.I. investigation that toppled the director of the C.I.A. and has now entangled the top American commander in Afghanistan underscores a danger that civil libertarians have long warned about: that in policing the Web for crime, espionage and sabotage, government investigators will unavoidably invade the private lives of Americans.

On the Internet, and especially in e-mails, text messages, social network postings and online photos, the work lives and personal lives of Americans are inextricably mixed. Private, personal messages are stored for years on computer servers, available to be discovered by investigators who may be looking into completely unrelated matters.

…“It’s a particular problem with cyberinvestigations — they rapidly become open-ended because there’s such a huge quantity of information available and it’s so easily searchable,” he said, adding, “If the C.I.A. director can get caught, it’s pretty much open season on everyone else.”

via Petraeus Case Raises Concerns About Americans’ Privacy – NYTimes.com.

Advertisements

One thought on “Petraeus Case Raises Concerns About Americans’ Privacy – NYTimes.com

  1. I think this is a great example of how easy our lives can be exposed. Like it says messages like text and email can be stored for years, giving investigators opportunities to infiltrate our private lives. I think ethically there is good and bad in this. I think individually we do and should expect a certain level of privacy. The things we do through email and text are very personal and should be kept private. However, when scenarios such as Petraeus’s evolve I do feel there is an ethical right to invade his private life to find and understand the real answers and problems. I think this article is an eye-opening experience for all of us seeing that even our CIA director can be subject to being investigated through his emails, texts and so forth.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s